Office 2013 is here

Although consumers and businesses are turning more often to Webbased software and mobile apps, many millions still depend on Microsoft Office to get their work done every day, on a PC, tablet or a Smartphone.

There’s no denying the power Microsoft Office has in business. From the smallest operations to the largest enterprise, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and the rest of the suite are ever-present.

Introducing Microsoft Office 2013 with a fresh new sleek appearance that reflects the look of Windows 8, impressive functional improvements and tie-ins to SharePoint and SkyDrive for storing documents online.

Anywhere Access:
Work from virtually anywhere with access to your latest documents and files using familiar Office applications, optimised for use across PCs, smartphones, and tablets.

Working Together:
Work together, easily using your familiar Office applications with business email, shared calendar, document sharing, and high definition video conferencing.

Look Professional:
New features in Excel allow you to easily visualize and analyze your data. New multimedia and graphics capabilities in Office enable you to create engaging presentations, documents, and spreadsheets.

Security and Reliability:
Keep confidential information highly secure by setting companywide policies through Policy Tips.

10 NEW ADDITIONS IN OFFICE 2013

1. Modern Style Interface

In keeping with the “Modern” (previously called “Metro”) style interface that you’ll see in Windows 8, Office 2013 has a new look. Everything is minimalist, flat, and stark—mimicking the tiles on the Windows 8 start screen.

2. Start Screens

Each app supports a new color-coded start screen—blue for Word, green for Excel, orange for PowerPoint, green for Publisher. Like the other applications’ start screens, the one for Word displays a list of recent documents. Though creating a blank document is the default option, you can alternatively select a template, search online for templates, or click Open Other Documents to search for a document on disk or in a SkyDrive folder. These screens will help new users find their way around more easily, and experienced users will appreciate having all of their options in one place at startup.

3. SkyDrive Integration

Office 2013 is designed to integrate with the cloud—with SkyDrive and SharePoint, in particular. That’s good news if you prefer to save your work online for anywhere-access, though most small businesses and individuals still save files locally. If you use SkyDrive, the account details will appear in the top left corner of all the application screens, as well as on their start screens. Click your account details to switch accounts and to manage them. When you save a document, worksheet, or presentation, the application will default to saving to your SkyDrive account, but you can save to your local disk if you wish. SkyDrive accounts are FREE for 7GB of  online storage.

4. Syncing Across Devices

When you save your Office documents online, they’ll be available to you (and others) from any device at any time, via Office 2013 on a PC or tablet, or via the WebApps. Microsoft has already upgraded the WebApps for Word, Excel, OneNote, and PowerPoint with the new Modern-style look and Office application color-coding. In addition, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint will save the last location where you were working before you saved–down to the letter, cell, or image. This feature makes it easier to pick up where you left off working, even if you open the file on a different device than you last used.

5. Touchscreen use

Some new Office 2013 features are designed to make working with a touchscreen easier. The new Read Mode in Word opens a document in reading view, which lets you scroll through the document by swiping horizontally with your finger. On a desktop with a touchscreen monitor, you can change this behavior back to the more traditional page navigation mode if you wish. Click the Touch Mode button on the Quick Access Toolbar—to the right of the program logo of each application—and the ribbon toolbar spreads its icons further apart for easier access to fingers.

6. PDF Editing

In the past you could save a Word document as a PDF file, but until now you couldn’t edit PDFs in Word without first converting them to Doc or DocX format. The new Word 2013 can open PDF files, edit them there, and then save them as either DocX files or PDFs.

7. Formatting Task Panes in PowerPoint

Formatting images, shapes, and other objects in PowerPoint is now more intuitive. Right-click an image and choose Format Picture to open the new Format Picture task pane, which shows the formatting options available for that object. Click another object, and the options in the task pane change to show only the options available for that object. You can leave the pane open as you work, so that it’s visible without cluttering your workspace.

8. Easier Charting

For users confused by the plethora of charting options in previous versions of Excel, the new Recommended Charts feature is useful. Select the data to chart and click Insert > Recommended Chart to see options such as line, bar, and pie charts that the program recommends for your data. Click each chart to preview what your data will look like in that form. After you select and create a chart, small icons will appear outside its top right corner when you select it, giving you access to work with chart elements, styles, and colors, and with the chart data itself.

 

9. More Graphics Options

In Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher, and even Outlook, new icons on the Insert tab of the ribbon toolbar let you insert pictures from your local PC or from various online sources. The online options include inserting images within the Office Clipart collection online, via a Bing search, or from your own SkyDrive or Flickr account.

10. Account Login

The Backstage View in Office 2013 applications (accessed via the File tab) includes a new tab called Account (or ‘Office Account’, in Outlook). Here you can log in to your SkyDrive account or switch accounts. You can also see a list of connected services, such as Twitter and Facebook, and add services, such as LinkedIn and SkyDrive.